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Farm Fencing
murchr
#81 Posted : Wednesday, September 06, 2017 3:34:05 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/26/2012
Posts: 15,957
Anyone knows anyone growing/selling thuja? A type of cypress

"There are only two emotions in the market, hope & fear. The problem is you hope when you should fear & fear when you should hope: - Jesse Livermore
.
murchr
#82 Posted : Thursday, January 31, 2019 7:10:54 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/26/2012
Posts: 15,957
kayhara wrote:
Boris Boyka wrote:
enyands wrote:
Boris Boyka wrote:
enyands wrote:
kiash wrote:
Gathige wrote:
[quote=murchr]Who has planted kei apple for themselves and not opted to buy from vendors? I want to know how its grown ie can i plant the stems in water for them to get roots so then transplant them? Please assist![/quote


@murchr, For Kei Apple, you plant the seeds and not the stems. BTW the seeds are edible and very sweet... It's a fruit. Start by getting the ripe fruits, which are yellow in colour. Each fruit has very many seeds which you can havest my manually removing the fresh and retain the tiny seeds. Then make some furrows along the intended fence and plant the seeds, water them and will then germinate. Once the seedlings reach knee height, u need to start coiling it to kake a good fence. For best results you can first do a chain link or berded wire fence and coil the kei apple on the fence. You can get the seeds from mature Kei apple during the fruiting season. Kei apple fence is laborious to manage as it requires regular trimming. The thorns are very prickly and painful. Best results if you have a big plot size as it can easily overgrow.

You can also buys seeds at a seeds shop or try KEFRI .

Best of luck






I remember these fruits when i was young , never tasted coz i heard they were poisonous.


The guy is confusing kei apple seeds with lokwats kwa kiswahili the yellow msabibu. I hope I got the correct spelling of lokwats. They have sweet ripe yellow seeds too

@enyands you're the confused one. It's true as @kiash says, some people eat those Kayaba fruits and I have seen. Lokwats we know them too they're eaten.


I'm not confused .kayapa fruits are very nasty I tried them when young and I know the taste hasn't changed .unless wewe Boris and your friends have discovered a sweetened genetically modified kayapa then I'll rest my case. .I don't know how your sensible friends can eat that thing .it's bitter like hell though deceiving yellow like lokwats fruits. That's what I meant. Kwani kizungu ni ngumu lol .I thought you were once a teacher ama
Is there any wazuan eating those fruits hapa.please tell us how they taste.

@nyandes has anyone ever said Lokwats are poisonous! There are so many edible bitter fruits and herbs which are consumed. Just because you don't like them doesn't become reason to generalize. You seem like haven't tasted lemon either... Wewe ni mtoto wa sugar and sweet things!

When I was in primary school we were asked to bring kaiyafa fruits, the 4k club then fermented them before sowing the resulting pulp, it came out well and the fence still stands today, I don't have to mention we took some of the fermented stuff hoping to get high, the school was smelling like an illicit beewery for weeks



I learnt alot from you guys....thanks. Now i am really running out of patience with my kei apple, what do you do to accelerate the growth?
"There are only two emotions in the market, hope & fear. The problem is you hope when you should fear & fear when you should hope: - Jesse Livermore
.
mmarto
#83 Posted : Friday, March 01, 2019 2:20:16 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 4/20/2010
Posts: 412
Location: nairobi
Quote:


I learnt alot from you guys....thanks. Now i am really running out of patience with my kei apple, what do you do to accelerate the growth?


patience mingi
The only time you should be looking down on others is when you are helping them up.
mmarto
#84 Posted : Friday, March 01, 2019 2:28:59 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 4/20/2010
Posts: 412
Location: nairobi
The only time you should be looking down on others is when you are helping them up.
mmarto
#85 Posted : Friday, March 01, 2019 2:35:06 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 4/20/2010
Posts: 412
Location: nairobi
The only time you should be looking down on others is when you are helping them up.
tom_boy
#86 Posted : Friday, March 01, 2019 8:35:01 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 2/20/2007
Posts: 767
mmarto wrote:

You need to ' shona ' the fence as it grows
They must find it difficult....... those who have taken authority as the truth, rather than truth as the authority. -G. Massey.
tom_boy
#87 Posted : Friday, March 01, 2019 8:36:32 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 2/20/2007
Posts: 767
How can one keep away monkeys from a shamba?
They must find it difficult....... those who have taken authority as the truth, rather than truth as the authority. -G. Massey.
mmarto
#88 Posted : Monday, March 04, 2019 8:13:03 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 4/20/2010
Posts: 412
Location: nairobi
tom_boy wrote:
mmarto wrote:

You need to ' shona ' the fence as it grows


I have done once. Will do it second time again end of march.
The only time you should be looking down on others is when you are helping them up.
murchr
#89 Posted : Monday, March 04, 2019 8:39:43 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/26/2012
Posts: 15,957
mmarto wrote:



I wish mine was like this. I've stopped looking at it now, since i don't see any difference. Then sadly, my local expert unexpectedly died last week out of illicit brew. Well...c'est la vie.
"There are only two emotions in the market, hope & fear. The problem is you hope when you should fear & fear when you should hope: - Jesse Livermore
.
amorphous
#90 Posted : Monday, November 30, 2020 7:06:10 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 5/15/2019
Posts: 657
Location: planet earth
tom_boy wrote:
How can one keep away monkeys from a shamba?



What a question to ask on a fencing thread. Call KWS?
New Normal!
amorphous
#91 Posted : Monday, November 30, 2020 7:33:43 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 5/15/2019
Posts: 657
Location: planet earth
I love these old threads. A true treasure trove of advice and experience. Wazoo should have a "halll of fame" thread section where some like these and the pablo/pennypincher mjengo threads can find comfort in.

I will NEVER, EVER, EVER plant Kayapa anywhere and anytime based on experience and expert advice.

Like a true Kenyan, when I was building my first house, I followed the herd mentality and started planting this South African weed with very sweet fruits (nani alisema ati hizo vitu si tamu?) called Dovyalis Caffra. By the way as an aside, I highly suspect the latter part of that scientific name was a corruption of the Boer "Kaffir" word but that is a story for another day.

At first the benefits seemed to outweigh any negatives; that those two to three inch thorns will be a nightmare for intruders, fruit benefits (said to be closely related in nutrient value to Apricot trees) and takes trimming into a neat square edge quite well. And what I LOVED the most was that it was even more effective securitywise than a masonry wall. Think about it. If you were a thief with a long ladder and some wire cutters for the razor wire resting on the masonry wall, would you rather meet a dense, thorny yet shaky kayafa "wall" that cannot hold your weight on the ladder instead? Unless you are nuts and love pain, of course not.

So the planting began.

Then I realised hizi vitu zinakunywa maji kuuuuu with a very high failure rate, especially for the tiny ones. You literally have to water them daily for several weeks. The day you miss watering is the day many will die. And even when they "shika" you might be dead by the time they reach six feet in height 10 years down the line.

Meanwhile, by some stroke of genius, I decided to plant bougainvillea alongside the terrible Kayafa. 6 months on the bougainvillea was waist high while the kayafa was barely ankle high even though they had "shikad" after many plantings and replantings/additions.

But then the worst happened...

One day I was walking in one of the residential backstreets of Kileleshwa (please do not ask why) and I came across a caretaker kamzeee in official work uniform sweating furiously standing on a step ladder, panga in hand, chopping down aged Kayafa that was 8 foot high and formed the perimeter fence of the apartment complex inside. I stopped, hand on chin and marvelled in great wonder as I watched him hack away with all his strength. His face was contorted in a grimace that almost evinced pain.As I watched him suffer he caught me zubaaring and stopped for a minute.

"Hiyo Kayapa ni ngumu kumaintain, eeeehh?" I grunted in sympathy.

"Ayayayayaya," he responded. Flailing his free hand in the air in disgust.

"Hii kitu ni shida sana, afadhali wangepanda tu bougainvillea kama hiyo," he retorted, pointing at a neatly trimmed nearby fence. "Kukata hiyo ni rahisi saaaaana," he exclaimed as goblets of sweat escaped his forehead.

It is the sight of that suffering man that gave me nightmares about the Kaffir plant.

As soon as I got home, nilizingoa zote. Thankfully, they are such stunted growers, it did not take me more than 30 minutes to uproot them all and happily pile them into the compost heap.

Instead, I planted yellow durantas, which too, make an excellent internal fence when trimmed tight. Since they grow way slower than bougainvillea, growing an outer layer of the latter and a tight inner wall of the former is an absolutely brilliant combi. Today I thank my lucky starts that I planted that way. The fence is beautiful, a nice yellow internal wall 6 feet high (with tiny thorns!) and beautiful blooms of bougainvillea in different shades peeping through the top and outer part of the fenceline. Trimming them is a breeze. A sharp slasher and a 2 hour afternoon is all one needs. Good luck trying to penetrate the fence..close to impossible given the bougainvillea is tightly shonwad into a solid woody lattice over the mesh chain link.

Bottom line, avoid Kaffir-Kayafa like the plague! Even on remote farms!

The best solution for huge remote farms BY FAR is Kariaria/Euphorbia.

Reasons;

1. Tis poisonous - no animals will want it
2. Tis hardy/drought resistant
3. Tis beautiful when mature and well trimmed
4. Nobody will steal it so you can even plant it billa barbed wired and poles
5. Does not need training at all due to its tree like growth habit
6. And by far the most important reason; unlike cactus of various types and other hardy fence plants, it is not invasive!

NIMESEMA!


New Normal!
Gathige
#92 Posted : Monday, November 30, 2020 9:52:38 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 3/29/2011
Posts: 2,229
amorphous wrote:
I love these old threads. A true treasure trove of advice and experience. Wazoo should have a "halll of fame" thread section where some like these and the pablo/pennypincher mjengo threads can find comfort in.

I will NEVER, EVER, EVER plant Kayapa anywhere and anytime based on experience and expert advice.

Like a true Kenyan, when I was building my first house, I followed the herd mentality and started planting this South African weed with very sweet fruits (nani alisema ati hizo vitu si tamu?) called Dovyalis Caffra. By the way as an aside, I highly suspect the latter part of that scientific name was a corruption of the Boer "Kaffir" word but that is a story for another day.

At first the benefits seemed to outweigh any negatives; that those two to three inch thorns will be a nightmare for intruders, fruit benefits (said to be closely related in nutrient value to Apricot trees) and takes trimming into a neat square edge quite well. And what I LOVED the most was that it was even more effective securitywise than a masonry wall. Think about it. If you were a thief with a long ladder and some wire cutters for the razor wire resting on the masonry wall, would you rather meet a dense, thorny yet shaky kayafa "wall" that cannot hold your weight on the ladder instead? Unless you are nuts and love pain, of course not.

So the planting began.

Then I realised hizi vitu zinakunywa maji kuuuuu with a very high failure rate, especially for the tiny ones. You literally have to water them daily for several weeks. The day you miss watering is the day many will die. And even when they "shika" you might be dead by the time they reach six feet in height 10 years down the line.

Meanwhile, by some stroke of genius, I decided to plant bougainvillea alongside the terrible Kayafa. 6 months on the bougainvillea was waist high while the kayafa was barely ankle high even though they had "shikad" after many plantings and replantings/additions.

But then the worst happened...

One day I was walking in one of the residential backstreets of Kileleshwa (please do not ask why) and I came across a caretaker kamzeee in official work uniform sweating furiously standing on a step ladder, panga in hand, chopping down aged Kayafa that was 8 foot high and formed the perimeter fence of the apartment complex inside. I stopped, hand on chin and marvelled in great wonder as I watched him hack away with all his strength. His face was contorted in a grimace that almost evinced pain.As I watched him suffer he caught me zubaaring and stopped for a minute.

"Hiyo Kayapa ni ngumu kumaintain, eeeehh?" I grunted in sympathy.

"Ayayayayaya," he responded. Flailing his free hand in the air in disgust.

"Hii kitu ni shida sana, afadhali wangepanda tu bougainvillea kama hiyo," he retorted, pointing at a neatly trimmed nearby fence. "Kukata hiyo ni rahisi saaaaana," he exclaimed as goblets of sweat escaped his forehead.

It is the sight of that suffering man that gave me nightmares about the Kaffir plant.

As soon as I got home, nilizingoa zote. Thankfully, they are such stunted growers, it did not take me more than 30 minutes to uproot them all and happily pile them into the compost heap.

Instead, I planted yellow durantas, which too, make an excellent internal fence when trimmed tight. Since they grow way slower than bougainvillea, growing an outer layer of the latter and a tight inner wall of the former is an absolutely brilliant combi. Today I thank my lucky starts that I planted that way. The fence is beautiful, a nice yellow internal wall 6 feet high (with tiny thorns!) and beautiful blooms of bougainvillea in different shades peeping through the top and outer part of the fenceline. Trimming them is a breeze. A sharp slasher and a 2 hour afternoon is all one needs. Good luck trying to penetrate the fence..close to impossible given the bougainvillea is tightly shonwad into a solid woody lattice over the mesh chain link.

Bottom line, avoid Kaffir-Kayafa like the plague! Even on remote farms!

The best solution for huge remote farms BY FAR is Kariaria/Euphorbia.

Reasons;

1. Tis poisonous - no animals will want it
2. Tis hardy/drought resistant
3. Tis beautiful when mature and well trimmed
4. Nobody will steal it so you can even plant it billa barbed wired and poles
5. Does not need training at all due to its tree like growth habit
6. And by far the most important reason; unlike cactus of various types and other hardy fence plants, it is not invasive!

NIMESEMA!




@amorphous, just a correction on 1 above, the succelent shoots of Kariaria are a delicacy for goats. Had planted it on my SHAMBA only to realize when they start shooting goats nimble them. But once they grow taller they do well.
"Things that matter most must never be at the mercy of things that matter least." Goethe
amorphous
#93 Posted : Monday, November 30, 2020 10:19:14 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 5/15/2019
Posts: 657
Location: planet earth
Gathige wrote:


@amorphous, just a correction on 1 above, the succelent shoots of Kariaria are a delicacy for goats. Had planted it on my SHAMBA only to realize when they start shooting goats nimble them. But once they grow taller they do well.



Correction well taken. Was aware that camels do munch them but quite unaware that goats do as well.
This must mean goats have a very strong and tough digestive system as that poisonous milky sap si mjezo.
New Normal!
mmarto
#94 Posted : Sunday, December 13, 2020 9:42:39 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 4/20/2010
Posts: 412
Location: nairobi
amorphous wrote:
I love these old threads. A true treasure trove of advice and experience. Wazoo should have a "halll of fame" thread section where some like these and the pablo/pennypincher mjengo threads can find comfort in.

I will NEVER, EVER, EVER plant Kayapa anywhere and anytime based on experience and expert advice.

Like a true Kenyan, when I was building my first house, I followed the herd mentality and started planting this South African weed with very sweet fruits (nani alisema ati hizo vitu si tamu?) called Dovyalis Caffra. By the way as an aside, I highly suspect the latter part of that scientific name was a corruption of the Boer "Kaffir" word but that is a story for another day.

At first the benefits seemed to outweigh any negatives; that those two to three inch thorns will be a nightmare for intruders, fruit benefits (said to be closely related in nutrient value to Apricot trees) and takes trimming into a neat square edge quite well. And what I LOVED the most was that it was even more effective securitywise than a masonry wall. Think about it. If you were a thief with a long ladder and some wire cutters for the razor wire resting on the masonry wall, would you rather meet a dense, thorny yet shaky kayafa "wall" that cannot hold your weight on the ladder instead? Unless you are nuts and love pain, of course not.

So the planting began.

Then I realised hizi vitu zinakunywa maji kuuuuu with a very high failure rate, especially for the tiny ones. You literally have to water them daily for several weeks. The day you miss watering is the day many will die. And even when they "shika" you might be dead by the time they reach six feet in height 10 years down the line.

Meanwhile, by some stroke of genius, I decided to plant bougainvillea alongside the terrible Kayafa. 6 months on the bougainvillea was waist high while the kayafa was barely ankle high even though they had "shikad" after many plantings and replantings/additions.

But then the worst happened...

One day I was walking in one of the residential backstreets of Kileleshwa (please do not ask why) and I came across a caretaker kamzeee in official work uniform sweating furiously standing on a step ladder, panga in hand, chopping down aged Kayafa that was 8 foot high and formed the perimeter fence of the apartment complex inside. I stopped, hand on chin and marvelled in great wonder as I watched him hack away with all his strength. His face was contorted in a grimace that almost evinced pain.As I watched him suffer he caught me zubaaring and stopped for a minute.

"Hiyo Kayapa ni ngumu kumaintain, eeeehh?" I grunted in sympathy.

"Ayayayayaya," he responded. Flailing his free hand in the air in disgust.

"Hii kitu ni shida sana, afadhali wangepanda tu bougainvillea kama hiyo," he retorted, pointing at a neatly trimmed nearby fence. "Kukata hiyo ni rahisi saaaaana," he exclaimed as goblets of sweat escaped his forehead.

It is the sight of that suffering man that gave me nightmares about the Kaffir plant.

As soon as I got home, nilizingoa zote. Thankfully, they are such stunted growers, it did not take me more than 30 minutes to uproot them all and happily pile them into the compost heap.

Instead, I planted yellow durantas, which too, make an excellent internal fence when trimmed tight. Since they grow way slower than bougainvillea, growing an outer layer of the latter and a tight inner wall of the former is an absolutely brilliant combi. Today I thank my lucky starts that I planted that way. The fence is beautiful, a nice yellow internal wall 6 feet high (with tiny thorns!) and beautiful blooms of bougainvillea in different shades peeping through the top and outer part of the fenceline. Trimming them is a breeze. A sharp slasher and a 2 hour afternoon is all one needs. Good luck trying to penetrate the fence..close to impossible given the bougainvillea is tightly shonwad into a solid woody lattice over the mesh chain link.

Bottom line, avoid Kaffir-Kayafa like the plague! Even on remote farms!

The best solution for huge remote farms BY FAR is Kariaria/Euphorbia.

Reasons;

1. Tis poisonous - no animals will want it
2. Tis hardy/drought resistant
3. Tis beautiful when mature and well trimmed
4. Nobody will steal it so you can even plant it billa barbed wired and poles
5. Does not need training at all due to its tree like growth habit
6. And by far the most important reason; unlike cactus of various types and other hardy fence plants, it is not invasive!

NIMESEMA!





My kayaffa have done extremely well...though taken like 7 years. My take.

Advantages;
1. If well managed it is tightly packed and a good natural fence.
2. Bees live off its flowers. If you keep bees on the side then you have good honey.
3.

Disadvantages;
1. Takes long to mature.
2. Trimming and maintenance requires someone with expertise
3. Once trimmed you must take care of the cutouts by burning them lest hizo dry thorns will be a mess kudunga miguu. You cant walk barefoot kwa compound.
The only time you should be looking down on others is when you are helping them up.
murchr
#95 Posted : Sunday, December 13, 2020 11:06:03 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/26/2012
Posts: 15,957
Euphorbia is poison. The sap latex is deadly take amorphous suggestions at your own peril. My parents had Kaiyafa planted as a hedge since the 80s and they've farmed all through. Why the hell are you watering the plant?
"There are only two emotions in the market, hope & fear. The problem is you hope when you should fear & fear when you should hope: - Jesse Livermore
.
amorphous
#96 Posted : Monday, December 14, 2020 2:19:07 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 5/15/2019
Posts: 657
Location: planet earth
mmarto wrote:
[

My kayaffa have done extremely well...though taken like 7 years. My take.

Advantages;
1. If well managed it is tightly packed and a good natural fence.
2. Bees live off its flowers. If you keep bees on the side then you have good honey.
3.

Disadvantages;
1. Takes long to mature.
2. Trimming and maintenance requires someone with expertise
3. Once trimmed you must take care of the cutouts by burning them lest hizo dry thorns will be a mess kudunga miguu. You cant walk barefoot kwa compound.


And these are precisely the reasons I will NEVER do Kayafa.
Whenever I see people hacking away at Kayafa furiously with a panga or slasher (hedge trimmers haziwezi mek!) I just chuckle in bemusement
Bougainvillea and durantas all the way!
Bogainvillea haina story mingi and of course its flowering habit has no match!




New Normal!
amorphous
#97 Posted : Monday, December 14, 2020 2:22:21 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 5/15/2019
Posts: 657
Location: planet earth
murchr wrote:
Euphorbia is poison. The sap latex is deadly take amorphous suggestions at your own peril. My parents had Kaiyafa planted as a hedge since the 80s and they've farmed all through. Why the hell are you watering the plant?



But this is precisely why you want it planted as a fence on a remote farm. Ndio watu na wanyama wasicheze na wewesmile
I also love that it stays evergreen, or turns nice shades of reddish..even under very low levels of water. This is another plant that does not have story mingi. Not having story mingi/needless headaches is a property owner's prime concern when it comes to maintenance of a fence IMHO.
New Normal!
murchr
#98 Posted : Monday, December 14, 2020 3:26:27 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 2/26/2012
Posts: 15,957
amorphous wrote:
murchr wrote:
Euphorbia is poison. The sap latex is deadly take amorphous suggestions at your own peril. My parents had Kaiyafa planted as a hedge since the 80s and they've farmed all through. Why the hell are you watering the plant?



But this is precisely why you want it planted as a fence on a remote farm. Ndio watu na wanyama wasicheze na wewesmile
I also love that it stays evergreen, or turns nice shades of reddish..even under very low levels of water. This is another plant that does not have story mingi. Not having story mingi/needless headaches is a property owner's prime concern when it comes to maintenance of a fence IMHO.


I'd rather have a person get pricked by some thorns than die of a plant i planted. Kei apple also stays ever green and is less disastrous to handle. For Euphorbia if that sap get into your eyes when you're trimming you are bound to go blind. Kei apple's main disadvantage is that it takes forever to grow. I dont know why KEFRI has not tried to re engineer a fast growing version or even one without thorns
"There are only two emotions in the market, hope & fear. The problem is you hope when you should fear & fear when you should hope: - Jesse Livermore
.
mmarto
#99 Posted : Wednesday, December 16, 2020 1:23:11 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 4/20/2010
Posts: 412
Location: nairobi
murchr wrote:
amorphous wrote:
murchr wrote:
Euphorbia is poison. The sap latex is deadly take amorphous suggestions at your own peril. My parents had Kaiyafa planted as a hedge since the 80s and they've farmed all through. Why the hell are you watering the plant?



But this is precisely why you want it planted as a fence on a remote farm. Ndio watu na wanyama wasicheze na wewesmile
I also love that it stays evergreen, or turns nice shades of reddish..even under very low levels of water. This is another plant that does not have story mingi. Not having story mingi/needless headaches is a property owner's prime concern when it comes to maintenance of a fence IMHO.


I'd rather have a person get pricked by some thorns than die of a plant i planted. Kei apple also stays ever green and is less disastrous to handle. For Euphorbia if that sap get into your eyes when you're trimming you are bound to go blind. Kei apple's main disadvantage is that it takes forever to grow. I dont know why KEFRI has not tried to re engineer a fast growing version or even one without thorns


Theres nothing absolute in this life... Kila kitu iko na utamu wake na disadvantage and so we have simply shared some experiences of some of these plants for people to decide.So make informed choices...Chaguo ni lako.
The only time you should be looking down on others is when you are helping them up.
amorphous
#100 Posted : Friday, December 18, 2020 8:44:23 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 5/15/2019
Posts: 657
Location: planet earth
mmarto wrote:

Theres nothing absolute in this life... Kila kitu iko na utamu wake na disadvantage and so we have simply shared some experiences of some of these plants for people to decide.So make informed choices...Chaguo ni lako.


Well put, brother
New Normal!
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