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The glory of living with less
Rollout
#1 Posted : Tuesday, June 18, 2019 7:08:28 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 4/26/2011
Posts: 714
I grew up in a 2 room house in a village in RV, I used to dream of big houses and nice cars. 17 years after moving to USA, I still dream of those houses, the only difference is my big houses dream has emptiness in them.

I enjoy my 2 bedroom apartment that I share with a wife. I have no physical asset other than a junk of a car that I drive around.

Back home in Kenya, my folk think I lost direction because I have not build a house, I have not bought a plot/land and I have no automobile parked outside my folks home waiting for me to drive. My neighbors who are also in US with me have built big houses in the village, some have plots in the city/town and love to be home in December for community/village events; I don't enjoy any of those stuff.

My life of less work well for me, I enjoy it, I have no commitment to any particular place or country, I sleep well knowing where every money I have earned is, I have no projects in progress, I owe no money to anyone and my life is as simple as it can get. Because the world glorify material possessions, I have managed to cruise unnoticed and that's what is most enjoyable.

Do you live with less? share your story.
Swenani
#2 Posted : Tuesday, June 18, 2019 8:39:06 PM
Rank: User


Joined: 8/15/2013
Posts: 13,013
Location: Vacuum
Rollout wrote:
I grew up in a 2 room house in a village in RV, I used to dream of big houses and nice cars. 17 years after moving to USA, I still dream of those houses, the only difference is my big houses dream has emptiness in them.

I enjoy my 2 bedroom apartment that I share with a wife. I have no physical asset other than a junk of a car that I drive around.

Back home in Kenya, my folk think I lost direction because I have not build a house, I have not bought a plot/land and I have no automobile parked outside my folks home waiting for me to drive. My neighbors who are also in US with me have built big houses in the village, some have plots in the city/town and love to be home in December for community/village events; I don't enjoy any of those stuff.

My life of less work well for me, I enjoy it, I have no commitment to any particular place or country, I sleep well knowing where every money I have earned is, I have no projects in progress, I owe no money to anyone and my life is as simple as it can get. Because the world glorify material possessions, I have managed to cruise unnoticed and that's what is most enjoyable.

Do you live with less? share your story.


You need to see a psychiatrist

Rollout wrote:
I grew up being told that if you work hard life will be amazing; I used to dream of being rich and cool, as a matter of facts, I used to window shop the things I planned to buy when I get the money. Fast forward to today, I have been blessed beyond my imagination but I feel empty and unsettle, most of the nights I am up because I can’t fall asleep, most of the days I am tired because I didn’t sleep. I put a lot of pressure on myself, I feel trapped in a never ending circle of money and career. The material things liked cars, clothes and the home I thought I’d buy, now that I have the means, I don’t want them. I can’t get to spent any money because I am scared of losing it. I have stashed good amount of money/assets but I can’t help myself but want more even when I know I don’t need it. I am miserable sometimes and I miss when I was hustling and celebrating small wins, nothing is good enough to celebrate anymore! All my broke friends seem really happy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Anyone feeling the same??????
Age: 35 Sex: Male Career: Venture Capital


Poverty is the root of all evil
Kusadikika
#3 Posted : Tuesday, June 18, 2019 9:15:08 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 7/22/2008
Posts: 2,472
The boundary situation is one in which the tragic figure has gone beyond the safety of defined explanations and the security of accepted norms. In this view, the tragic situation is not defined by the occurrence of terrible and rending events, but rather by the level of awareness and questioning it has engendered in the tragic figure. In this state, his quest for truth has led him to his own, individual confrontation with the meaning of his experience. It is Job on the dung heap, Orestes confronted by the horror of what he must do, and Oedipus confronted by the horror of what he has done.

This is man confronting his world in full recognition of what Jung (1938) termed "the terrible ambiguity of immediate experience." Without the reassurance of logical systems or the resignation of blind acceptance, the tragic figure must attempt to understand his experience in the face of all its complexity and ambiguity and to take responsibility for creating meaning and value in a world in which fundamental questions often have no reassuring answers. Sewall has noted that the Greek tragedians "affirmed the absolutes like justice and order, but revealed a universe that promised neither and often dealt out the reverse." (p.46)

It is against this backdrop that the tragic figure undertakes his quest to understand the meaning of his experience. As Sewall has noted, it is a quest that



recalls the original terror, harking back to a world that antedates the conception of philosophy, the consolations of the later religions, and whatever constructions the human mind has devised to persuade itself that the universe is secure. It recalls the original un-reason, the terror of the irrational. It sees man as questioner, naked, unaccommodated, alone, facing mysterious, demonic forces in his own nature and outside, and the irreducible facts of suffering and death. Thus it is not for those who cannot live with unresolved questions or unresolved doubts, whose bent of mind would reduce the fact of evil into something else or resolve it into some larger whole. (pp. 4 f)



It is essential to recognize that this quest cannot be a solely intellectual one. In the tragic vision, the most important knowledge comes not from intellectual speculation, but from the understanding of one's actual experience of acting in the world. The very essence of the tragic sense of life involves meaningful action. As Sewall notes,



Only man in action, man "on the way," begins to reveal the possibilities of his nature for good and bad and for both at once. And only in the most pressing kinds of action, action that involves the ultimate risk and pushes him to the very limits, are the fullest possibilities revealed. (p.47)

newfarer
#4 Posted : Tuesday, June 18, 2019 10:15:29 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 3/19/2010
Posts: 3,194
Location: Uganda
Rollout wrote:
I grew up in a 2 room house in a village in RV, I used to dream of big houses and nice cars. 17 years after moving to USA, I still dream of those houses, the only difference is my big houses dream has emptiness in them.

I enjoy my 2 bedroom apartment that I share with a wife. I have no physical asset other than a junk of a car that I drive around.

Back home in Kenya, my folk think I lost direction because I have not build a house, I have not bought a plot/land and I have no automobile parked outside my folks home waiting for me to drive. My neighbors who are also in US with me have built big houses in the village, some have plots in the city/town and love to be home in December for community/village events; I don't enjoy any of those stuff.

My life of less work well for me, I enjoy it, I have no commitment to any particular place or country, I sleep well knowing where every money I have earned is, I have no projects in progress, I owe no money to anyone and my life is as simple as it can get. Because the world glorify material possessions, I have managed to cruise unnoticed and that's what is most enjoyable.

Do you live with less? share your story.

again I tell you that you need Jesus...

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=vo10dAPonfs
punda amecheka
Lolest!
#5 Posted : Wednesday, June 19, 2019 6:12:52 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 3/18/2011
Posts: 11,546
Location: Kianjokoma
Swenani Laughing out loudly Laughing out loudly . Go easy on the brotherLaughing out loudly
Swenani wrote:
Rollout wrote:
I grew up in a 2 room house in a village in RV, I used to dream of big houses and nice cars. 17 years after moving to USA, I still dream of those houses, the only difference is my big houses dream has emptiness in them.

I enjoy my 2 bedroom apartment that I share with a wife. I have no physical asset other than a junk of a car that I drive around.

Back home in Kenya, my folk think I lost direction because I have not build a house, I have not bought a plot/land and I have no automobile parked outside my folks home waiting for me to drive. My neighbors who are also in US with me have built big houses in the village, some have plots in the city/town and love to be home in December for community/village events; I don't enjoy any of those stuff.

My life of less work well for me, I enjoy it, I have no commitment to any particular place or country, I sleep well knowing where every money I have earned is, I have no projects in progress, I owe no money to anyone and my life is as simple as it can get. Because the world glorify material possessions, I have managed to cruise unnoticed and that's what is most enjoyable.

Do you live with less? share your story.


You need to see a psychiatrist

Rollout wrote:
I grew up being told that if you work hard life will be amazing; I used to dream of being rich and cool, as a matter of facts, I used to window shop the things I planned to buy when I get the money. Fast forward to today, I have been blessed beyond my imagination but I feel empty and unsettle, most of the nights I am up because I can’t fall asleep, most of the days I am tired because I didn’t sleep. I put a lot of pressure on myself, I feel trapped in a never ending circle of money and career. The material things liked cars, clothes and the home I thought I’d buy, now that I have the means, I don’t want them. I can’t get to spent any money because I am scared of losing it. I have stashed good amount of money/assets but I can’t help myself but want more even when I know I don’t need it. I am miserable sometimes and I miss when I was hustling and celebrating small wins, nothing is good enough to celebrate anymore! All my broke friends seem really happy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Anyone feeling the same??????
Age: 35 Sex: Male Career: Venture Capital



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