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Descendants of Slaves Kidnapped from Kenya
mv_ufanisi
#1 Posted : Thursday, June 18, 2020 5:01:31 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 596
Being a big history buff, I'm very interested in finding out about how slavery affected Kenyans and Kenyan tribes. I'm also keen to make sure that we don't forget this important history that connects us with black people all over the world some of whom were kidnapped and stolen from us.

So I've been doing some research and this is what I can find so far.

Would appreciate Wazuans who are in the know sharing more content here.

Kikuyu People

Mustapha Olpak - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mustafa_Olpak was an Afro-Turkish writer and activist whose ancestors were Kikuyu people who were sold into slavery in 1890 to Turkey. His book Kenya-Girit-İstanbul: Köle Kıyısından İnsan Biyografileri has been compared to Alex Haley's Roots.

Kamba People
There is a group of Afro-Paraguayans who were descended from Kamba people and have managed to maintain their culture. They are called Kamba Kua and Kamba Kokue in Paraguay. Here's some links to them
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Op4-nZypCQ
mv_ufanisi
#2 Posted : Friday, June 19, 2020 12:45:07 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 596
Here are two books showing some of the earliest journeys into Kenya by European explorers and troublemakers

1. Discovery of Lake Rudolf and Stephanie - the journey by Count Samuel Teleki written by Ludwig von Hohnel which happened circa 1887 and 1888
https://books.google.co....epage&q&f=false

Here is an image of a Kikuyu War Shield which Count Teleki donated to a Hungarian Museum afterwards

https://www.neprajz.hu/e..._kikuyu-war-shield.html

2. Through Jungle and Desert by William Astor Chanler circa 1892
https://www.google.com/b...&printsec=frontcover
mv_ufanisi
#3 Posted : Monday, June 22, 2020 11:07:00 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 596
The e-book called “The Discovery of Lake Rudolf and Lake Stefanie” by Ludgwig von Hohnel which describes Count Samuel Teleki’s travel to Lake Turkana between 1887 and 1888.

On Page 284, it says “Abdullah had bought 200 Slaves from Kikuyuland and Kambaland on his way from the coast to Lake Baringo”.

On Page 302 there is an account of the Count Teleki’s caravan being offered slaves for sale in Kikuyuland including a young woman with a baby at her breast and with a three year old little boy at her hand all of who were then bought by Jumbe Kimameta for twenty rings of iron wire and twenty strings of Masai beads all of which were approimately equal to the value of 1 Dollar.

Here being clear evidence of slave dealing in Kikuyuland.
kaka2za
#4 Posted : Monday, June 22, 2020 11:44:53 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 10/3/2008
Posts: 4,023
Location: Gwitu
mv_ufanisi wrote:
The e-book called “The Discovery of Lake Rudolf and Lake Stefanie” by Ludgwig von Hohnel which describes Count Samuel Teleki’s travel to Lake Turkana between 1887 and 1888.

On Page 284, it says “Abdullah had bought 200 Slaves from Kikuyuland and Kambaland on his way from the coast to Lake Baringo”.

On Page 302 there is an account of the Count Teleki’s caravan being offered slaves for sale in Kikuyuland including a young woman with a baby at her breast and with a three year old little boy at her hand all of who were then bought by Jumbe Kimameta for twenty rings of iron wire and twenty strings of Masai beads all of which were approimately equal to the value of 1 Dollar.

Here being clear evidence of slave dealing in Kikuyuland.


If want to know if something existed in a community, check if there is a local name or word for it.
Kikuyu have a name for slaves but none for gays.
Even none for fish!
Truth forever on the scaffold
Wrong forever on the throne
(James Russell Rowell)
Lolest!
#5 Posted : Monday, June 22, 2020 3:11:44 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 3/18/2011
Posts: 12,059
Location: Kianjokoma
kaka2za wrote:
mv_ufanisi wrote:
The e-book called “The Discovery of Lake Rudolf and Lake Stefanie” by Ludgwig von Hohnel which describes Count Samuel Teleki’s travel to Lake Turkana between 1887 and 1888.

On Page 284, it says “Abdullah had bought 200 Slaves from Kikuyuland and Kambaland on his way from the coast to Lake Baringo”.

On Page 302 there is an account of the Count Teleki’s caravan being offered slaves for sale in Kikuyuland including a young woman with a baby at her breast and with a three year old little boy at her hand all of who were then bought by Jumbe Kimameta for twenty rings of iron wire and twenty strings of Masai beads all of which were approimately equal to the value of 1 Dollar.

Here being clear evidence of slave dealing in Kikuyuland.


If want to know if something existed in a community, check if there is a local name or word for it.
Kikuyu have a name for slaves but none for gays.
Even none for fish!

But we've heard how the southern Kikuyu sold Maasai refugees
Laughing out loudly smile Applause d'oh! Sad Drool Liar Shame on you Pray
kaka2za
#6 Posted : Monday, June 22, 2020 3:46:06 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 10/3/2008
Posts: 4,023
Location: Gwitu
Lolest! wrote:
kaka2za wrote:
mv_ufanisi wrote:
The e-book called “The Discovery of Lake Rudolf and Lake Stefanie” by Ludgwig von Hohnel which describes Count Samuel Teleki’s travel to Lake Turkana between 1887 and 1888.

On Page 284, it says “Abdullah had bought 200 Slaves from Kikuyuland and Kambaland on his way from the coast to Lake Baringo”.

On Page 302 there is an account of the Count Teleki’s caravan being offered slaves for sale in Kikuyuland including a young woman with a baby at her breast and with a three year old little boy at her hand all of who were then bought by Jumbe Kimameta for twenty rings of iron wire and twenty strings of Masai beads all of which were approimately equal to the value of 1 Dollar.

Here being clear evidence of slave dealing in Kikuyuland.


If want to know if something existed in a community, check if there is a local name or word for it.
Kikuyu have a name for slaves but none for gays.
Even none for fish!

But we've heard how the southern Kikuyu sold Maasai refugees


Precisely!
Kikuyus have a name for slaves 'Ngombo' which means slavery existed
Truth forever on the scaffold
Wrong forever on the throne
(James Russell Rowell)
sqft
#7 Posted : Monday, June 22, 2020 4:04:15 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/10/2015
Posts: 764
Location: Kenya
mv_ufanisi wrote:
The e-book called “The Discovery of Lake Rudolf and Lake Stefanie” by Ludgwig von Hohnel which describes Count Samuel Teleki’s travel to Lake Turkana between 1887 and 1888.

On Page 284, it says “Abdullah had bought 200 Slaves from Kikuyuland and Kambaland on his way from the coast to Lake Baringo”.

On Page 302 there is an account of the Count Teleki’s caravan being offered slaves for sale in Kikuyuland including a young woman with a baby at her breast and with a three year old little boy at her hand all of who were then bought by Jumbe Kimameta for twenty rings of iron wire and twenty strings of Masai beads all of which were approimately equal to the value of 1 Dollar.

Here being clear evidence of slave dealing in Kikuyuland.


I have read the book and it states clearly that the slaves were wakamba or maasai or those captured/ escapees from trading caravans. Note that whenever the kikuyu raided other communities they killed the men and old women and took away the young women. And those captured could not be taken as wives by their captors but were seen as property. So yes kikuyus had slaves but those slaves were not kikuyus.

Pg 340
Quote:
The natives (wakikuyu) brought food ,weapons, and ornaments in great qantities for sale. They also offered us slaves , chiefly girls from Ukambani, with a few Masai maidens. They were ready to accept almost anything in payment, but they preferred deep red Masai beads and thick brass wire. Some of our people,
who had been ailing ever since we left Taveta, ran away here in the night, probably tempted by the fertility of the land , but their fate was pretty sure to be slavery , and the natives always consider such fugitives their property. A good many caravan
men are caught in this way, but they always hope to evade their new masters on some favourable opportunity.
Proverbs 13:11 Dishonest money dwindles away, but whoever gathers money little by little makes it grow.
sqft
#8 Posted : Monday, June 22, 2020 4:14:33 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/10/2015
Posts: 764
Location: Kenya
kaka2za wrote:


If want to know if something existed in a community, check if there is a local name or word for it.
Kikuyu have a name for slaves but none for gays.
Even none for fish!


The rivers in central are too cold for fish. Trout, a cold-water fish, was introduced by colonialists. Tilapia was also introduced in the lower warmer areas like sagana. That is why kikuyu don't have a history with fish and referred to fish as tadpoles aka ciunguyu.
Proverbs 13:11 Dishonest money dwindles away, but whoever gathers money little by little makes it grow.
mv_ufanisi
#9 Posted : Monday, June 22, 2020 10:58:04 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 596
Lolest! wrote:
kaka2za wrote:
mv_ufanisi wrote:
The e-book called “The Discovery of Lake Rudolf and Lake Stefanie” by Ludgwig von Hohnel which describes Count Samuel Teleki’s travel to Lake Turkana between 1887 and 1888.

On Page 284, it says “Abdullah had bought 200 Slaves from Kikuyuland and Kambaland on his way from the coast to Lake Baringo”.

On Page 302 there is an account of the Count Teleki’s caravan being offered slaves for sale in Kikuyuland including a young woman with a baby at her breast and with a three year old little boy at her hand all of who were then bought by Jumbe Kimameta for twenty rings of iron wire and twenty strings of Masai beads all of which were approimately equal to the value of 1 Dollar.

Here being clear evidence of slave dealing in Kikuyuland.


If want to know if something existed in a community, check if there is a local name or word for it.
Kikuyu have a name for slaves but none for gays.
Even none for fish!

But we've heard how the southern Kikuyu sold Maasai refugees


whats your source for this information?
mv_ufanisi
#10 Posted : Monday, June 22, 2020 11:00:27 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 596
sqft wrote:
mv_ufanisi wrote:
The e-book called “The Discovery of Lake Rudolf and Lake Stefanie” by Ludgwig von Hohnel which describes Count Samuel Teleki’s travel to Lake Turkana between 1887 and 1888.

On Page 284, it says “Abdullah had bought 200 Slaves from Kikuyuland and Kambaland on his way from the coast to Lake Baringo”.

On Page 302 there is an account of the Count Teleki’s caravan being offered slaves for sale in Kikuyuland including a young woman with a baby at her breast and with a three year old little boy at her hand all of who were then bought by Jumbe Kimameta for twenty rings of iron wire and twenty strings of Masai beads all of which were approimately equal to the value of 1 Dollar.

Here being clear evidence of slave dealing in Kikuyuland.


I have read the book and it states clearly that the slaves were wakamba or maasai or those captured/ escapees from trading caravans. Note that whenever the kikuyu raided other communities they killed the men and old women and took away the young women. And those captured could not be taken as wives by their captors but were seen as property. So yes kikuyus had slaves but those slaves were not kikuyus.

Pg 340
Quote:
The natives (wakikuyu) brought food ,weapons, and ornaments in great qantities for sale. They also offered us slaves , chiefly girls from Ukambani, with a few Masai maidens. They were ready to accept almost anything in payment, but they preferred deep red Masai beads and thick brass wire. Some of our people,
who had been ailing ever since we left Taveta, ran away here in the night, probably tempted by the fertility of the land , but their fate was pretty sure to be slavery , and the natives always consider such fugitives their property. A good many caravan
men are caught in this way, but they always hope to evade their new masters on some favourable opportunity.


which book are u referring to with page 340? I'm looking for that passage but cant seem to find it
mv_ufanisi
#11 Posted : Monday, June 22, 2020 11:04:38 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 596
kaka2za wrote:
Lolest! wrote:
kaka2za wrote:
mv_ufanisi wrote:
The e-book called “The Discovery of Lake Rudolf and Lake Stefanie” by Ludgwig von Hohnel which describes Count Samuel Teleki’s travel to Lake Turkana between 1887 and 1888.

On Page 284, it says “Abdullah had bought 200 Slaves from Kikuyuland and Kambaland on his way from the coast to Lake Baringo”.

On Page 302 there is an account of the Count Teleki’s caravan being offered slaves for sale in Kikuyuland including a young woman with a baby at her breast and with a three year old little boy at her hand all of who were then bought by Jumbe Kimameta for twenty rings of iron wire and twenty strings of Masai beads all of which were approimately equal to the value of 1 Dollar.

Here being clear evidence of slave dealing in Kikuyuland.


If want to know if something existed in a community, check if there is a local name or word for it.
Kikuyu have a name for slaves but none for gays.
Even none for fish!

But we've heard how the southern Kikuyu sold Maasai refugees


Precisely!
Kikuyus have a name for slaves 'Ngombo' which means slavery existed


I wonder how many Kenyans were sold into far away lands in this way and where they now are. Apart from the Kamba Kua and Kokue of Paraguay and Mustapha Olpak do we know of any others? There must be a lot more in Arabia, India, Pakistan and around such areas. The Sindh area of Pakistan has a large Afro population which most likely came from East Africa
mv_ufanisi
#12 Posted : Monday, June 22, 2020 11:10:02 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 596
It is claimed that one if the reasons that the population of East Africa never was that big was because of the endless slave trade. Given that the east African slave trade started about 700 or so years before the West African one, we must have lost a huge number of people to the Arab caravans.

Unfortunately this history is very hidden and we dont really learn about it in Kenyan history. I remember seeing a black emirati in Dubai and wondering if he might be descended from Kenya.

Here's a story about a Siddi in Pakistan who was the first to be nominated to their parliament. https://www.google.com/a.../amp/world-asia-45099970
kaka2za
#13 Posted : Monday, June 22, 2020 11:49:38 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 10/3/2008
Posts: 4,023
Location: Gwitu
[quote=mv_ufanisi]It is claimed that one if the reasons that the population of East Africa never was that big was because of the endless slave trade. Given that the east African slave trade started about 700 or so years before the West African one, we must have lost a huge number of people to the Arab caravans.

Unfortunately this history is very hidden and we dont really learn about it in Kenyan history. I remember seeing a black emirati in Dubai and wondering if he might be descended from Kenya.

Here's a story about a Siddi in Pakistan who was the first to be nominated to their parliament. https://www.google.com/a...amp/world-asia-45099970[/quote]





There isn't much in our oral history about slave raids so they probably never happened.
Truth forever on the scaffold
Wrong forever on the throne
(James Russell Rowell)
mv_ufanisi
#14 Posted : Tuesday, June 23, 2020 7:33:14 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 596
kaka2za wrote:
[quote=mv_ufanisi]It is claimed that one if the reasons that the population of East Africa never was that big was because of the endless slave trade. Given that the east African slave trade started about 700 or so years before the West African one, we must have lost a huge number of people to the Arab caravans.

Unfortunately this history is very hidden and we dont really learn about it in Kenyan history. I remember seeing a black emirati in Dubai and wondering if he might be descended from Kenya.

Here's a story about a Siddi in Pakistan who was the first to be nominated to their parliament. https://www.google.com/a...amp/world-asia-45099970[/quote]





There isn't much in our oral history about slave raids so they probably never happened.


the fact the last of these raids happened in the early 1900s. Most of the others would have happened during the 1800s and before. We have lost most oral history from such periods.

there was debt based indenturement - the word ngobo in Kikuyu comes from the word ngoba, which suggests a debt. so some people went into the debt of others especially during famines and sometimes many would put up their women and children for a debt especially during famine.
sqft
#15 Posted : Tuesday, June 23, 2020 8:35:21 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/10/2015
Posts: 764
Location: Kenya
mv_ufanisi wrote:
sqft wrote:
mv_ufanisi wrote:
The e-book called “The Discovery of Lake Rudolf and Lake Stefanie” by Ludgwig von Hohnel which describes Count Samuel Teleki’s travel to Lake Turkana between 1887 and 1888.

On Page 284, it says “Abdullah had bought 200 Slaves from Kikuyuland and Kambaland on his way from the coast to Lake Baringo”.

On Page 302 there is an account of the Count Teleki’s caravan being offered slaves for sale in Kikuyuland including a young woman with a baby at her breast and with a three year old little boy at her hand all of who were then bought by Jumbe Kimameta for twenty rings of iron wire and twenty strings of Masai beads all of which were approimately equal to the value of 1 Dollar.

Here being clear evidence of slave dealing in Kikuyuland.


I have read the book and it states clearly that the slaves were wakamba or maasai or those captured/ escapees from trading caravans. Note that whenever the kikuyu raided other communities they killed the men and old women and took away the young women. And those captured could not be taken as wives by their captors but were seen as property. So yes kikuyus had slaves but those slaves were not kikuyus.

Pg 340
Quote:
The natives (wakikuyu) brought food ,weapons, and ornaments in great qantities for sale. They also offered us slaves , chiefly girls from Ukambani, with a few Masai maidens. They were ready to accept almost anything in payment, but they preferred deep red Masai beads and thick brass wire. Some of our people,
who had been ailing ever since we left Taveta, ran away here in the night, probably tempted by the fertility of the land , but their fate was pretty sure to be slavery , and the natives always consider such fugitives their property. A good many caravan
men are caught in this way, but they always hope to evade their new masters on some favourable opportunity.


which book are u referring to with page 340? I'm looking for that passage but cant seem to find it

Page 315 Vol 1.
Proverbs 13:11 Dishonest money dwindles away, but whoever gathers money little by little makes it grow.
sqft
#16 Posted : Tuesday, June 23, 2020 9:21:02 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/10/2015
Posts: 764
Location: Kenya
kaka2za wrote:
mv_ufanisi wrote:
It is claimed that one if the reasons that the population of East Africa never was that big was because of the endless slave trade. Given that the east African slave trade started about 700 or so years before the West African one, we must have lost a huge number of people to the Arab caravans.

Unfortunately this history is very hidden and we dont really learn about it in Kenyan history. I remember seeing a black emirati in Dubai and wondering if he might be descended from Kenya.

Here's a story about a Siddi in Pakistan who was the first to be nominated to their parliament. https://www.google.com/a...amp/world-asia-45099970






There isn't much in our oral history about slave raids so they probably never happened.


Slave trade was based at zanzibar and raids were carried out in tanganyika. There are no reports of slave traders such as Tipu tip operating in what became kenyan territory but they would move from bagamoyo all the way to mwanza on lake victoria. Of course shimoni area of kenya which borders TZ was affected. Also it was very difficult to penetrate maasai country to the north of tz and the maasais would rather die than be taken as slaves.
Proverbs 13:11 Dishonest money dwindles away, but whoever gathers money little by little makes it grow.
sqft
#17 Posted : Tuesday, June 23, 2020 9:53:39 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/10/2015
Posts: 764
Location: Kenya
Seems agriculture was very developed in kikuyu country in the 1800s, many yrs before colonialism.

Entry into kikuyu country Pg 302
Quote:
A little further tramp uphill through the narrow belt of primæval forest which forms a natural frontier encircling the whole of Kikuyuland, and we found ourselves on its inner edge, looking down upon a
charming landscape, with nothing to recall the dense woods with which it had once been covered but here and there a group of trees or a few stumps some three feet high . From the picturesque little groves still left rose columns of smoke, betraying the presence of native settlements, whilst all around them as far as the eye could reach stretched well-cultivated, undulating pasture-lands, which were a revelation to us, explaining the ease with which the Wakikuyu can supply the needs of the largest caravans.



Pg 315
Quote:
In the ravines and valleys flow insignificant streams, and the country is almost bare of trees , but very well cultivated , the more humid valleys with sugar-cane, more rarely with bananas or colocasia ; the hill- slopes with potatoes, beans, gums, millet, tobacco , and so on.


Pg 332
Quote:
During our march here (within wakikuyu country) we had passed through districts so carefully and systematically cultivated that we might have been in Europe.


Pg 352
Quote:
In the light grey volcanic soil of Kikuyuland grow nearly all the cereals native to East Africa, and it is , in fact, the granary of a very extended district. Several kinds of bananas are grown as well as beans, sugar- cane, maize, potatoes, yams,
eleusine, dhurra, millet (Panicum italicum , L .), mawale ( Pennisetum spicatum ), gourds, colocasia, and tobacco . Of course all these are not equally distributed, millet, beans, and potatoes
being most plentiful in the south , whilst bananas abound in the north and millet is entirely absent.
The occurrence of millet in Kikuyuland is of peculiar
significance , as it has not so far been met with elsewhere in
Africa.

Bananas are seldom allowed to become ripe, and we could rarely get them . They are picked when still green and either cooked for food or dried to make flour. Dhurra, eleusine, and yams are also used for flour. Sugar- cane thrives admirably here, but it does not grow to the great height it attains in
tropical lowlands. The natives chew it and also sometimes make it into an intoxicating beverage.

The Wakikuyu are not only zealous agriculturalists, they also keep bees and breed cattle, sheep, poultry and goats - occassionary castrating the rams - which they are willing to sell, though it is difficult to get them to part with their cattle.
Proverbs 13:11 Dishonest money dwindles away, but whoever gathers money little by little makes it grow.
mv_ufanisi
#18 Posted : Thursday, June 25, 2020 8:56:50 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 596
Here's an interesting story about afro Iranians who are mostly descended from slaves captured from East Africa. It's amazing that none of this stuff exists in our history lessons.

https://www.asiabyafrica...-iranians-slavery-legacy
mv_ufanisi
#19 Posted : Thursday, June 25, 2020 8:59:32 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 596
[quote=mv_ufanisi]Here are two books showing some of the earliest journeys into Kenya by European explorers and troublemakers

1. Discovery of Lake Rudolf and Stephanie - the journey by Count Samuel Teleki written by Ludwig von Hohnel which happened circa 1887 and 1888
https://books.google.co....epage&q&f=false

Here is an image of a Kikuyu War Shield which Count Teleki donated to a Hungarian Museum afterwards

https://www.neprajz.hu/e..._kikuyu-war-shield.html

2. Through Jungle and Desert by William Astor Chanler circa 1892
https://www.google.com/b...amp;printsec=frontcover[/quote]

Theres two volumes of the book in no 1.The link given is for Volume II. The link for Volume I is https://books.google.co....%20stefanie&f=false
mv_ufanisi
#20 Posted : Thursday, June 25, 2020 10:03:29 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 596
page 331 vol I

there is an uninhabited district in Kikuyuland because it was deserted to escape from slaving raids by the Kamba. this shows you that some Kikuyu people were captured as slaves and probably sold to the coast by the Kamba just as elsewhere in the text that some Kamba slaves were found among the Kikuyu
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