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3 Pages<123
Descendants of Slaves Kidnapped from Kenya
mv_ufanisi
#41 Posted : Tuesday, July 28, 2020 6:12:41 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 589
Here could be some other potential candidates for DNA Testing to check the impact of the slave trade. The Al-Khadem of Yemen. Likely descended from slaves captured in East Africa. https://www.khaleejtimes...-in-occupied-west-bank.
mv_ufanisi
#42 Posted : Tuesday, July 28, 2020 6:17:08 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 589
Lolest! wrote:
radiomast wrote:
mv_ufanisi wrote:


There is a group of Afro-Paraguayans who were descended from Kamba people and have managed to maintain their culture. They are called Kamba Kua and Kamba Kokue in Paraguay. Here's some links to them
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Op4-nZypCQ



Kamba Cua are the most logical target for DNA testing. It would be great to ascertain how related they are to Akamba.

Still find it hard to believe that we have Akamba slave descendants in South America

East coast of Africa to America? Odd.


That's probably because you have not got deeper into the history of the East African coast. Ships from even the east coast of the United States came to East Africa and bought slaves off. Same thing for the Portuguese who are more likely to have sent off people to the Americas.

The French were the most notorious because of sending people off to Mauritius to work in Sugar Plantations.

It's a shameful part of our history that is conveniently swept under the carpet.
madollar
#43 Posted : Wednesday, July 29, 2020 3:40:26 AM
Rank: Veteran


Joined: 11/17/2009
Posts: 1,950
Location: GA
interesting read regarding african americans

The study found, in line with the major slave route, that most Americans of African descent have roots in territories now located in Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Genetic impact of African slave trade revealed in DNA study
kmucheke
#44 Posted : Wednesday, July 29, 2020 7:45:44 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 3/16/2019
Posts: 172
mv_ufanisi wrote:
Here could be some other potential candidates for DNA Testing to check the impact of the slave trade. The Al-Khadem of Yemen. Likely descended from slaves captured in East Africa. https://www.khaleejtimes...-in-occupied-west-bank.


Indeed, a DNA testing study is needed for African descendants living in the Gulf and Asia.

Afro-Iranians who are mostly descendants of Bantus from South East Africa are another interesting group.
The link is here.
Quote:
Several times every week, they rehearse an energetic and hypnotic style of music unique to their community, sometimes called Bandari
The group calls themselves Bambasi, proudly adopting the word used to describe Iranians of African descent.


You have to admit the word Bandari and Bambasi sound very Swahili-ish.
kmucheke
#45 Posted : Wednesday, July 29, 2020 7:52:03 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 3/16/2019
Posts: 172
madollar wrote:
interesting read regarding african americans

The study found, in line with the major slave route, that most Americans of African descent have roots in territories now located in Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Genetic impact of African slave trade revealed in DNA study


Which part of DRC? How did they get them out of DRC?
DRC extends from central Africa upto the pacific, did that pacific shoreline have a port?

I wish all these studies were being done by Africans themselves. Too bad we are preoccupied with other stuff.
radiomast
#46 Posted : Wednesday, July 29, 2020 9:30:19 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 2/15/2018
Posts: 404
Ovimbundu of Angola and Bakongo of DRC and Angola contributed the most slaves particularly those who went to the Carribbean and Latin America. Among blacks in Latin America, some bantu words are still used. For example, in the Palanquero language, cattle are called Ngombe which came from Kikongo. Haitian creole also incorporates Kikongo words like Nzumbi which they refer to as Zombi and which is now known in English as Zombie.
Slaves in the English Carribbean mostly came from Nigeria/Ghana/Liberia and other areas where the British had influence.

USA slaves also came from Angola in significant numbers but also from other parts. The largest prison in the United States is called Angola prison. It was named Angola prison because it was originally a slave plantation and the slaves were from Angola.
kmucheke
#47 Posted : Wednesday, July 29, 2020 10:18:11 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 3/16/2019
Posts: 172
radiomast wrote:
Ovimbundu of Angola and Bakongo of DRC and Angola contributed the most slaves particularly those who went to the Carribbean and Latin America. Among blacks in Latin America, some bantu words are still used. For example, in the Palanquero language, cattle are called Ngombe which came from Kikongo. Haitian creole also incorporates Kikongo words like Nzumbi which they refer to as Zombi and which is now known in English as Zombie.
Slaves in the English Carribbean mostly came from Nigeria/Ghana/Liberia and other areas where the British had influence.

USA slaves also came from Angola in significant numbers but also from other parts. The largest prison in the United States is called Angola prison. It was named Angola prison because it was originally a slave plantation and the slaves were from Angola.


Quote:
In 2010, the racial composition of the inmates was 76% black, 24% white. Many prison employees are from families that have lived and worked at Angola for generations. As of 2009 Angola had 3,712 inmates on life sentences, making up 74% of the population that year.


Isn't this slavery being perpetuated in form of criminal justice?

13th is a 2016 Netflix documentary directed by Ava Duvernay exploring the mass incerceration of African-Americans and its roots in racism. Its called 13th after the Thirteenth Amendment to the US Constitution to abolish slavery.

You can watch it here for free.

https://youtu.be/krfcq5pF8u8

mv_ufanisi
#48 Posted : Wednesday, July 29, 2020 10:22:00 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 589
kmucheke wrote:
mv_ufanisi wrote:
Here could be some other potential candidates for DNA Testing to check the impact of the slave trade. The Al-Khadem of Yemen. Likely descended from slaves captured in East Africa. https://www.khaleejtimes...-in-occupied-west-bank.


Indeed, a DNA testing study is needed for African descendants living in the Gulf and Asia.

Afro-Iranians who are mostly descendants of Bantus from South East Africa are another interesting group.
The link is here.
Quote:
Several times every week, they rehearse an energetic and hypnotic style of music unique to their community, sometimes called Bandari
The group calls themselves Bambasi, proudly adopting the word used to describe Iranians of African descent.


You have to admit the word Bandari and Bambasi sound very Swahili-ish.


great article thanks for sharing!
mv_ufanisi
#49 Posted : Wednesday, July 29, 2020 10:29:34 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 589
Here's an old BBC article about Frere Town and interviews with Mambo Mbotela whose grandfather was captured as a slave in Malawi. In Kenya, Shimoni was the place where slaves captured from the Kenyan mainland were sold off to Arab slave ships. Perhaps this is where the ancestors of Kamba Kue or Mustapha Olpak passed through. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/6510675.stm
madhaquer
#50 Posted : Tuesday, August 04, 2020 3:39:13 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 11/10/2010
Posts: 254
Location: Nairobi
kmucheke wrote:
madollar wrote:
interesting read regarding african americans

The study found, in line with the major slave route, that most Americans of African descent have roots in territories now located in Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Genetic impact of African slave trade revealed in DNA study


Which part of DRC? How did they get them out of DRC?
DRC extends from central Africa upto the pacific, did that pacific shoreline have a port?

I wish all these studies were being done by Africans themselves. Too bad we are preoccupied with other stuff.


There is a wonderful book "Medieval Africa, 1250–1800 by Roland Oliver" it makes a wonderful read on the history of Africa in general with chapters covering each part...

The Portuguese discovered the mouth of the Congo river in 1483. Here is an extract from pg 168:

THE PORTUGUESE AND THE OPENING OF THE ATLANTIC
Such in outline was the situation in western Central Africa when in 1483 a Portuguese caravel captained by the famous navigator Diogo Cão, sailing southwards on a voyage of exploration from Elmina, encountered muddy water several miles offshore and turned eastwards to investigate. Thus Cão reached the estuary of the Congo, called by the local people Nzadi (whence Zaïre), and made contact with the subjects of the Manikongo, Nzinga a Nkuwu. In the course of a later voyage in 1485-6 Cão visited the capital, twenty-three days’ march inland, and then sailed home carrying a party of Kongo emissaries, who on their arrival in Lisbon were baptised into the Christian faith and placed in a monastery for initiation into Western
ways. They were returned to Kongo in 1491 in a fleet of three caravels, carrying Portuguese priests, masons, carpenters and soldiers, a selection of domestic animals including horses and cattle, samples of European cloth and other manufactures, even a printing-press complete with two German printers. The ships anchored at Mpinda in the Congo estuary, and after a brief halt to baptise the provincial governor of Soyo, who was an uncle of the Manikongo, the expedition proceeded to the capital, where Nzinga a Nkuwu and five of his leading chiefs were baptised on 3 May 1491.


Reading further on the ongoing tribal wars,

Of course, despite his Christian piety, Afonso was throughout his reign deeply involved in the capture and sale of slaves to the Portuguese. It was the inevitable price which he had to pay for his European advisers and for the material luxuries with which he rewarded his chief subjects. Without doubt, his slaving wars gave a military impetus to his kingdom and consolidated his authority in the border regions to the east and the south. The condition of success in these adventures was, however, that the trade should remain a royal monopoly. Hence his growing disquiet with the Portuguese sea-captains, who tried to trade directly with his subjects and even with his enemies.

With the weakening of the Kongo kingdom following
the death of Afonso, the raided became the raiders, joining forces with the Mbundu, not only for the defence of Ndongo but in many subsequent invasions of Kongo territory. These began during the reign of Afonso’s grandson, Diogo (1545-61). His successor, Bernardo (1561-7), was killed while fighting the Yaka on the eastern frontier. The next king, Henrique (1567-8), died in a war against the Teke. His successor, Alvaro (1567-8), had barely acceded when the whole eastern side of the Kongo kingdom was laid waste by a great invasion of Yaka war-bands, which swept through the provinces of Mbata and Mpemba, capturing and sacking São Salvador itself in 1569.
Alvaro fled with his courtiers to an island in the lower Congo and sent desperate appeals for help to his Portuguese allies.
Meantime the Yaka made profitable contact with the São Tomé traders at the ports of the Congo estuary, to whom they sold thousands of their Kongo captives, including members of the royal family and other notables.


HTH
wukan
#51 Posted : Tuesday, August 04, 2020 4:25:11 PM
Rank: Veteran


Joined: 11/13/2015
Posts: 1,450
mv_ufanisi
#52 Posted : Tuesday, August 04, 2020 5:42:50 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 589
wukan wrote:


Thanks for this great content. Here is the story of Mustafa OLPAK who was coined the term Afro-Turk. Mustafa OLPAK's ancestors were Kikuyus who were enslaved in 1890, taken to Crete and sold in Rethymno. Here's a link of the story of this remarkable man
https://www.blackstarnew...of-african-awakening-in
mv_ufanisi
#53 Posted : Tuesday, August 04, 2020 5:52:38 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 589
https://www.nation.co.ke...tory-of-slavery-1184974

The Shimoni Slavery Museum in Kilifi tells the story of slavery on the Kenyan coast. Slaves captured on the mainland were kept in these caves before being shipped off to Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, India, China and Iran.
kmucheke
#54 Posted : Tuesday, August 04, 2020 6:05:53 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 3/16/2019
Posts: 172
madhaquer wrote:
kmucheke wrote:
madollar wrote:
interesting read regarding african americans

The study found, in line with the major slave route, that most Americans of African descent have roots in territories now located in Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Genetic impact of African slave trade revealed in DNA study


Which part of DRC? How did they get them out of DRC?
DRC extends from central Africa upto the pacific, did that pacific shoreline have a port?

I wish all these studies were being done by Africans themselves. Too bad we are preoccupied with other stuff.


There is a wonderful book "Medieval Africa, 1250–1800 by Roland Oliver" it makes a wonderful read on the history of Africa in general with chapters covering each part...

The Portuguese discovered the mouth of the Congo river in 1483. Here is an extract from pg 168:

THE PORTUGUESE AND THE OPENING OF THE ATLANTIC
Such in outline was the situation in western Central Africa when in 1483 a Portuguese caravel captained by the famous navigator Diogo Cão, sailing southwards on a voyage of exploration from Elmina, encountered muddy water several miles offshore and turned eastwards to investigate. Thus Cão reached the estuary of the Congo, called by the local people Nzadi (whence Zaïre), and made contact with the subjects of the Manikongo, Nzinga a Nkuwu. In the course of a later voyage in 1485-6 Cão visited the capital, twenty-three days’ march inland, and then sailed home carrying a party of Kongo emissaries, who on their arrival in Lisbon were baptised into the Christian faith and placed in a monastery for initiation into Western
ways. They were returned to Kongo in 1491 in a fleet of three caravels, carrying Portuguese priests, masons, carpenters and soldiers, a selection of domestic animals including horses and cattle, samples of European cloth and other manufactures, even a printing-press complete with two German printers. The ships anchored at Mpinda in the Congo estuary, and after a brief halt to baptise the provincial governor of Soyo, who was an uncle of the Manikongo, the expedition proceeded to the capital, where Nzinga a Nkuwu and five of his leading chiefs were baptised on 3 May 1491.


Reading further on the ongoing tribal wars,

Of course, despite his Christian piety, Afonso was throughout his reign deeply involved in the capture and sale of slaves to the Portuguese. It was the inevitable price which he had to pay for his European advisers and for the material luxuries with which he rewarded his chief subjects. Without doubt, his slaving wars gave a military impetus to his kingdom and consolidated his authority in the border regions to the east and the south. The condition of success in these adventures was, however, that the trade should remain a royal monopoly. Hence his growing disquiet with the Portuguese sea-captains, who tried to trade directly with his subjects and even with his enemies.

With the weakening of the Kongo kingdom following
the death of Afonso, the raided became the raiders, joining forces with the Mbundu, not only for the defence of Ndongo but in many subsequent invasions of Kongo territory. These began during the reign of Afonso’s grandson, Diogo (1545-61). His successor, Bernardo (1561-7), was killed while fighting the Yaka on the eastern frontier. The next king, Henrique (1567-8), died in a war against the Teke. His successor, Alvaro (1567-8), had barely acceded when the whole eastern side of the Kongo kingdom was laid waste by a great invasion of Yaka war-bands, which swept through the provinces of Mbata and Mpemba, capturing and sacking São Salvador itself in 1569.
Alvaro fled with his courtiers to an island in the lower Congo and sent desperate appeals for help to his Portuguese allies.
Meantime the Yaka made profitable contact with the São Tomé traders at the ports of the Congo estuary, to whom they sold thousands of their Kongo captives, including members of the royal family and other notables.


HTH


Wow. This is very enlightening stuff. Thank you!Applause
wukan
#55 Posted : Tuesday, August 04, 2020 8:10:38 PM
Rank: Veteran


Joined: 11/13/2015
Posts: 1,450
Let me leave this here. I doubt your history teachers touched on it. This rebellion is what enabled the swahili civilization to thrive unmolested for 800 years. After that rebellion the Arabs stopped east africa slave raids for 800 years




kmucheke
#56 Posted : Friday, August 14, 2020 6:13:38 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 3/16/2019
Posts: 172
Yasuke a black samurai from East Africa (either Ethiopia or a dinka from Sudan).


kmucheke
#57 Posted : Saturday, August 15, 2020 4:11:59 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 3/16/2019
Posts: 172
There are descendants of slaves, merchants, soldiers from East Africa known as Sheedi's or Siddi's in South Asia (mostly Pakistan and India).


mv_ufanisi
#58 Posted : Monday, August 24, 2020 5:17:30 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 589


There are more than 1 million black Iraqis most of whom are descended from East Africa
mv_ufanisi
#59 Posted : Monday, August 24, 2020 5:23:52 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/15/2010
Posts: 589


Here it says there are more than 2 million black Iraqis. They were happy when Barack Obama won the elections.
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